My books

I’m doing a giveaway of ten copies of How to write an Amazon book that SELLS. To enter the giveaway, click on the link below.

Goodreads Book Giveaway

How to write an Amazon book that SELLS* by David Kessler

How to write an Amazon book that SELLS*

by David Kessler

Giveaway ends December 09, 2015.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

 

How to write an Amazon fiction book - coverWell it’s done. Written. Finished. That is the writing is done. And the publishing. Now comes the selling. This is pretty much the most comprehensive treatise on writing and selling books for the Kindle that you’ll find. Kindle and CreateSpace. Okay that’s Kindle and CreateSpace that you’ll f–oh, er and Smashwords. The three platforms that you can learn to write best-selling books for with this treatise are the Kindle, CreateSpace and Smashwords. And of course Lulu.

How to write - paperback coverAll right, this is pretty much the most comprehensive treatise on writing and selling books for the Kindle, CreateSpace, Smashwords and Lulu that you’ll find. Not forgetting, of course, books written in the hope of getting them published by mainstream publishers. Okay, just to make it clear: among the platforms and outlets that you can use the information in this treatise to write books for are the Kindle, CreateSpace… Shall I go out and start again?

Anyway, suffice it to say that this book is available (with slightly different titles) for the Kindle (How to write an Amazon fiction book that SELLS*: *by someone who HAS… MANY TIMES!
) and in paperback (How to write an Amazon book that SELLS: by someone who HAS… MANY TIMES !

And for two days (Sunday 29th November and Monday 30th November) the Kindle edition will be available FREE.

 

Cold Turkey - Amazon cover
Cold Turkey is the story of two drug-addicted brothers, Lee and Mark, who kidnap a right-wing radio talk-show host and deliberately set about getting him addicted to heroin, after he has angered them by mouthing off about “junkies” and their lack of “moral fibre.” To some extent they are merely taking him up on his own hubristic posturing:

“You could kidnap me tomorrow,” he bragged, “shoot me up with smack till I’m hooked and I could kick the habit cold turkey!”

But when they take up his challenge, he fails to live up to his boast and his life spirals out of control. And yet their victory is a Pyrrhic one, as differences between the brothers come to the fore, forcing them to re-evaluate their own lives – culminating in Lee taking a most extraordinary decision.

I first had the idea of Cold Turkey while I was sharing a flat with a psychologically-dependent drug user in South London. Although he was an irritating chav, a thief and even, at times, a wife-beater (or at least girlfriend-beater), I also learned about his background and the events that turned him into what he became. I saw his dependency on the friend who got him into the drug scene – a sort of substitute older brother – and the vicious circle he had got himself into. I also saw his vulnerability, how that was exploited by others and the rage that sometimes flared up within him.

The characters in this story are by no means “based on” my former flatmate and his drug-using friends. They are, however, inspired by them. The real-life character was never viciously beaten by his father. But he was thrown out by both parents after their acrimonious divorce, because of his own behaviour and at one point ended up on the streets at the age of 12, when he was “taken in” (in both senses of the expression) by a young man who introduced him to drugs and took advantage of him sexually. (Ironically, they remain friends and drug-buddies to this day, except for moments when “Lee” goes into a rage – usually under the influence of alcohol rather than drugs.

I wrote this story to explore the minds of people trapped in a downward spiral of self-destructive behaviour. I have seen “Lee” off drugs as well as on. Unlike the brothers in this film, he does not “do needles” – although some of his friends do. In truth, he is not physically addicted to heroin or any other drug – or at least was not for most of the time I knew him. Like the character in the film, he has been to prison several times, for offences like stealing (to get drug money) and violence whether against shop-keepers or others with whom he has got into conflict, under the influence of alcohol. And like the character in the film, he has been off drugs, but has always relapsed and got back “on the gear” – usually as soon as he was out of prison. (NB he did not need methadone in prison – except on one occasion.)

The novel explores such questions as: to what extent are we in control of our own lives? Are we the captains of our souls or at the mercy of the winds of fate. Can one achieve anything alone or does one always need a friend? And are some friendships toxic?

Asking these questions in the context of the modern day problem of drug (and alcohol) addiction, we see the thin line that separates winners from losers and get a glimpse of the fragility of the lifestyles that some of us take for granted.

There is also a US Kindle edition, a US paperback edition and a UK paperback edition: Cold Turkey
.

 

A pregnant Italian woman who suffered a panic attack when she forgot to take her medication for Bipolar Disorder was forcibly (actually unconsciously) subjected to a “compulsory caesarean section on the decision of the High Court under an ex-parte order obtained by social workers. (Ex-parte means that the other party didn’t get notice, wasn’t consulted and had no opportunity to challenge the decision.) This MIGHT be justified in itself if it was to address an immediate crisis. But the Essex authorities went on to refuse to return the child and have now put it up for adoption. This goes far beyond addressing the immediate crisis and raises questions about both the honesty and integrity of the Essex Social Services and the commitment of the British courts to law.

The claim made by the social services, was that she might suffer a relapse. A judge in Chelmsford Crown Court accepted this argument and ruled that the child should be put up for adoption in the UK. Now you would think that a judge would know the law. But this ignorant judge did not seem to realize that as the mother was normally resident in Italy, the matter of custody of the child falls within the jurisdiction of the Italian courts not the British ones.

The woman, who incidentally has two other children in Italy, has never been allowed to see the child, who is now 15 months old.

The question is why was this blatantly illegal action taken by the Essex Social Services and backed up by a judge who one presumes must have known better. Could it be that Essex is short of babies for adoption and is looking for short-cuts to find more? Even if it involves fabricating bogus pretexts and breaking the law? It reminds me of a book I wrote a few years back about a baby racket conspiracy between social services and a devious paediatrician: How I cleared my mother of a murder charge when I was eleven (The Ethan and Lexie adventures)


 


I am pleased to announce the relaunching of this book:

When 10-year-old Ethan’s Blaine’s parents decide to have another baby, it’s the happiest day of their lives. But the sudden, unexplained death of the baby plunges their world into tragedy. And things get worse when Ethan’s mother is accused of murder by an over-zealous doctor. With the help of his new book-wise friend Lexie Thatcher (a judge’s daughter) Ethan does the only thing that any internet-savvy kid can do – he turns detective!

By using the Internet and hacking into various computer networks, Ethan discovers a web of lies and corruption involving a devious doctor and a crooked social worker. But it turns personal when he finds out that his parents may be involved in a baby-selling racket.

And with his mother’s case now being heard by the jury, the intrepid Ethan realizes that he cannot solve the case from the comfort of his room and the safety of his computer. He most go out into the world to find the answers – even if it means risking his life …

 

 


Yes folks it’s finally arrived – the Alex Sedaka thriller that you’ve all been waiting for – and it promises to be the legal thriller of the year!

SWITZERLAND – the Jungfrau Region: A wealthy young man dies in a skiing accident.

SAN FRANCISCO: A few months later, two homeless men stagger into a bar. One of them leaves his friend there, but minutes later the friend is stabbed by another homeless man: George Stone.

Arrested at the scene and charged with murder with special circumstances, Stone asks for Alex Sedaka to represent him. However, it soon becomes apparent that this is anything but a straightforward case of violence between homeless people. After all, how many homeless people have $2000 on them. And why would a homeless killer leave such a large sum on his victim? Also… why is the British Prime Minister taking such an interest in the murder of a homeless “John Doe” over five thousand miles away?

But when Homeland Security becomes involved and an attempt is made on the accused man’s life, both Alex and the DA realize that matters are running out of control. And as powerful forces up the ante, Alex also has to face the fact that his client isn’t the only one in danger.

You can buy Hello darkness, my old friend (an Alex Sedaka thriller) from amazon.co.uk. Outside the UK, it is available from amazon.com.

 

 

 

 

The launching of Mercy in America has been a huge success with some 20,000 copies downloaded in six weeks.

It’s also been getting some good reviews – along with some bad ones. One person gave it one star whilst admitting that he hadn’t read it. Another gave it a five star review before she had finished it. But that is different. She at least was in the process of reading it. The other one was antagonized by the fact that he thought the preceding seven reviews were fake. One wonders what he made of the five five-star reviews that followed in short order, several from verified purchases?

But that’s a burden we writer’s have to bear.

Anyway, it seems to have made a bit of an impact and quite a few readers have bought the second Alex Sedaka book No Way Out.

Now I’m hard at work on the third in the series.

 
Cover B

 

The Kindle edition of Mercy is now available in the USA. And for two days – Wednesday 29th February and Thursday the 1st of March – it is available absolutely FREE!!!!

So click on the link and get it while you can and review it and tell all your friends what you think about it!

Oh, and while you’re here, let me know which of these two covers is better.

Thanks,

David Kessler

 


1.    Thou shalt create an intelligent hero specializing in some arcane academic subject.

2.    Thou shalt provide thy hero with a helpmate in the form of an attractive and somewhat younger heroine, also intelligent, usually possessed of wisdom in a complimentary field that she may assist thy hero without duplicating his skills.

3.    Thou shalt begin thy story with a violent death, usually of a good person, who may be associated with the hero, but dost not have to be.

4.    Thou shalt include in thy story a secretive organization, usually one that has been around for donkey’s years and has links to history and may also have had famous people as members.

5.    Thy hero shalt progress through a maze of mysteries and puzzles and must solve the immediate step in the puzzle before he be allowed to progress to the next stage in thy story.

6.    Thou shalt put obstacles in the path of thy hero in the form of a strong and dastardly villain that art trying to stop thy hero and foil his efforts.  Thy dastardly villain shall be willing to resort to committing the most heinous of crimes in pursuit of his nefarious agenda.  However, thy dastardly villain shall not act on his own initiative or in his own interests but rather shall he be subservient to shadowy figures in the background of thy story.

7.    The masters of thy dastardly villain shall be a powerful organization (see 4th Commandment) that hath a vested interest in foiling the hero because he doth threaten their interests or the established order.

8.    Thou shalt set thy story in an exotic location, or series of locations, that playeth a major part in thy story or in the historical background to thy story.

9.    Towards the end of thy story, it shall finally dawn upon thy hero (as it surely hath already on most of thy readers) that the hero is being betrayed by one who is close to him (but not the female lead) and that the traitor be associated with the very organization that hath been trying to stop thy hero all along.

10.    Notwithstanding thy hero’s sense of righteous indignation at the betrayal, he shall surely solve the final step in the mystery and successfully overcome the obstacles, without the aid of the Almighty, but with some help from the heroine, with whom he shall end up with in a state of transient connubial bliss (albeit outside the bonds of holy matrimony).

 

The next book in the Dov Shamir Adventures is now available. In Checkmate at the Beauty Pageant (The Dov Shamir Adventures) top Israeli intelligence officer Dov Shamir is called in to locate and rescue a bunch of 32 beauty queens kidnapped by eccentric computer software entrepreneur Lee Chadwick and taken to a secret island somewhere in the Caribbean.

Chadwick threatens to kill the girls unless former American and world chess champion Billy Segal is persuaded to come out of retirement and play against a super-powerful computer chess program that runs on the internet. But Segal has lost his nerve…

Follow the link to get the book – and for a few days it is available FREE!!!!