mystery

 


Yes folks it’s finally arrived – the Alex Sedaka thriller that you’ve all been waiting for – and it promises to be the legal thriller of the year!

SWITZERLAND – the Jungfrau Region: A wealthy young man dies in a skiing accident.

SAN FRANCISCO: A few months later, two homeless men stagger into a bar. One of them leaves his friend there, but minutes later the friend is stabbed by another homeless man: George Stone.

Arrested at the scene and charged with murder with special circumstances, Stone asks for Alex Sedaka to represent him. However, it soon becomes apparent that this is anything but a straightforward case of violence between homeless people. After all, how many homeless people have $2000 on them. And why would a homeless killer leave such a large sum on his victim? Also… why is the British Prime Minister taking such an interest in the murder of a homeless “John Doe” over five thousand miles away?

But when Homeland Security becomes involved and an attempt is made on the accused man’s life, both Alex and the DA realize that matters are running out of control. And as powerful forces up the ante, Alex also has to face the fact that his client isn’t the only one in danger.

You can buy Hello darkness, my old friend (an Alex Sedaka thriller) from amazon.co.uk. Outside the UK, it is available from amazon.com.

 

 

 

 

The launching of Mercy in America has been a huge success with some 20,000 copies downloaded in six weeks.

It’s also been getting some good reviews – along with some bad ones. One person gave it one star whilst admitting that he hadn’t read it. Another gave it a five star review before she had finished it. But that is different. She at least was in the process of reading it. The other one was antagonized by the fact that he thought the preceding seven reviews were fake. One wonders what he made of the five five-star reviews that followed in short order, several from verified purchases?

But that’s a burden we writer’s have to bear.

Anyway, it seems to have made a bit of an impact and quite a few readers have bought the second Alex Sedaka book No Way Out.

Now I’m hard at work on the third in the series.

 
Cover B

 

The Kindle edition of Mercy is now available in the USA. And for two days – Wednesday 29th February and Thursday the 1st of March – it is available absolutely FREE!!!!

So click on the link and get it while you can and review it and tell all your friends what you think about it!

Oh, and while you’re here, let me know which of these two covers is better.

Thanks,

David Kessler

 

Hurry!!!!! Ethan and the Devious Doctor for the Amazon Kindle is available free until December 30. So get your skates on and click on the link to go to Amazon and get the book FREE – now… while you still can…
  

 

The price of the eBook edition of The Moses Legacy has been slashed to £1.99 to welcome in the forthcoming summer holidays.

So if you’re looking for something interesting to read on your Kindle Wireless Reading Device, Wi-Fi, Graphite, 6″ Display with New E Ink Pearl Technology, Kindle 3G Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G + Wi-Fi, 3G Works Globally, Graphite, 6″ Display with New E Ink Pearl Technology or iBook reader, you can now get it for under two quid.

For a great summer read – look no further.

 

 

The latest developments in “space archaeology” are looking very promising. They are sure to promote renewed interest in Egypt and Egyptgology. Now all we need is for Zahi Hawass to be replaced by a man with a bit more humility and Egyptology will be able to progress.

 

Check out the new promotional video for the Moses Legacy.

 

I returned from Israel on the 5th of October, refreshed and with a fair amount of the first draft written.   Although it had been principally a holiday, I had taken advantage of the relaxing environment to work.  I actually do my best writing on holiday.  Upon my return, I updated Kate and Diane on my progress, but Diane was snowed under with work after the London Book Fair and it it took a while for her to get back to me.

Meanwhile I plowed on with the book, in-between making marketing suggestions and sending a couple of examples of the snake motif to help the cover designer.  Then I noticed that Amazon had pre-listed the book as The Moses Legacy rather than The Moses Tablet.  I wrote to Kate about this and she realized that she had subconsciously briefed the designer with that name too.  We all thought about it further and Kate and I agreed that in fact The Moses Legacy was actually better.  Diane also agreed and so now the book was back to the original title that I had first thought of when I pitched the idea.

Finally on November the 11th – less than three months after I had started – I submitted the first draft to Kate and Diane.  And this was a book that I was still researching while I was writing it!  And it was a lot of research!  And I had a holiday in between.  Kate and Diane were both impressed and now all I had to do was sit tight while they read it and gave me their feedback.

However, like most writers, I kept re-reading it.  And the more I reread, the more I thought about how I should have done things differently and how I wanted to change it.  But I couldn’t change it now, because Kate was reading it and presumably making editorial notes.  So I wrote an eMail with the subject line “Post-Natal depression” explaining in general terms that I had been thinking about changes and had come up with some ideas.  We agreed that I would make notes of my ideas but wait for her editorial comments before making any changes or even telling Kate my ideas.  That way her editorial notes would be entirely her own and we would be able to see to what extent we agreed about the necessary changes.

On the 29th of November Kate and I talked on the phone.  She was very impressed with the story and some of the set pieces but had found some faults that I hadn’t thought about.  I for my part wanted to make some even more radical changes that would make the ending more focused and dramatic.  Kate agreed that these could work, but they might require other changes earlier in the story and she was concerned that because we were already operating in a tight time-frame that I might be able to make it on time.  However, she left it to my judgement and I know that the ball as in my court and it was up to me to deliver.

 

Check out the new promotional video for the Moses Legacy.

 

On the 19th of August 2010, Diane, my agent, wrote back to me that she personally liked my suggested title Shibboleth, but felt that it was difficult to pronounce.  She said that the title needed to be catchy and memorable.  Although this wasn’t an outright negative, I decided to give it some more thought and not yet put the suggested title to Kate, my editor.  In the meantime got on with writing the book. (I had already written two chapters in four days and felt that the going was good.)

On the 27th of August, I wrote to Diane again, proudly boasting that I was ahead of schedule with the writing and suggesting that maybe we could get HarperCollins to bring out the book in April to coincide with the Jewish festival of Passover.  I thought that as the book was about a conspiracy concerning Moses and the Biblical Exodus of the Israelite slaves from Egypt that this would be particularly appropriate.  But Diane pointed out that the significance of the suggested date had to be balanced against the fact that Summer was a better slot than Spring, although she agreed to run the idea by Kate for a second opinion.

I continued working on the book and then on the 15th of September I got an eMail from Kate that the Avon team had been having discussions on the title and their favourite was The Sacred Sign.  I felt a little put out because it seemed that a decision had been reached before I was given a chance to offer any input.  There was nothing essentially wrong with The Sacred Sign (although I suspect it was an attempt to ride on the coat-tails of The Lost Symbol), but I felt that I should have been given a chance to offer a few suggestions before it got to the group discussion stage.

I wrote back explaining my feelings and offering the title Shibboleth, along with my argument about it being unknown but enigmatic, like The Tesseract.  I also suggested that my non-de-plume for the new project be Abe Phillips.  Kate wrote back promptly that Shibboleth and my other suggestions didn’t really work, but agreed that the nom-de-plume was okay and agreed to put it to the team.

There followed a brief exchange in which I pushed gently for my preference, but Kate held firm.  The gist of Kate’s argument – which in retrospect makes perfect sense – is that the title should be clear and straightforward.  In particular, she pointed out that The Tesseract, which I had offered as an example, was an exception – a word-of-mouth hit in the era before the supermarkets packed such clout in the book retail market.  Furthermore, the Avon list specialized in selling through the supermarkets.  Our discussions spilt over into the question of whether we should be so heavily reliant on the supermarkets, especially as they have little patience for slow-burners.  But as Kate pointed out, we have to operate within the existing market and the supermarkets do pack the most clout.

The exchange was good-natured, but it was clear to all of us that the differences were far from resolved.  Wanting to find some common ground, I suggested a book giveaway on Goodreads before publication, to get some pre-publication reviews and generate some buzz in advance.  Two days later I went to Israel for two weeks, for the Jewish festival of Succot and three days into my visit, after clearing my head in the fresh Jerusalem air, I wrote to Kate again explaining that having thought about it, I was warming to the title The Sacred Sign.  This was partly because I had been thinking about the cover design and I had come up with the idea of a snake coiled around a pole (called “the Rod of Asclepius” by the ancient Greeks, but also associated with Moses and with the pharmaceutical industry).

Imagine my surprise then, when Kate wrote back to tell me that she had been reconsidering and had now decided that the title The Moses Tablet was fine after all!  It seems that we were like ships that pass in the night… never quite meeting.

In paralel with this, the discussions about my pen name were continuing.  In addition to Abe Phillips, I was offering various alternatives like Phil Abrams and Maurice Palmer – the latter a pun on Michael Caine’s real name of Maurice Mickelwhite and the character Harry Palmer whom he played in the films of several Len Deighton books.  They liked the  surname “Palmer” but thought that “Maurice” was a bit weak, suggesting Michael Palmer as an alternative.  I liked this, but a quick web check revealed that there already was a Michael Palmer writing thrillers in America and he was still active.  But as we all liked the surname, I suggested keeping it and using the first name Adam – the Biblical First Man.

Kate agreed and so now – just a few days before I was due to go to Israel for the Jewish festival of Succot – we had a title (The Moses Tablet) an author’s “name” (Adam Palmer) and a cover designer working on some ideas, one of which I had suggested myself.

What we didn’t know was that there already an Adam Palmer and that he had written a critique of the Da Vinci Code – the prime example of the very genre that I was trying to break into.